Tuesday, November 01, 2005

Potholes 2, bike light 0

A week or two ago, in preparation for the end of daylight savings time and the inevitable dusk commutes home, I installed a new rear light to replace the one that was crushed by an SUV earlier this fall. Today, probably somewhere between Chestnut Hill and Washington Square, the light broke off. The mounting piece is still firmly attached to my light, but the light itself? Gone into oblivion. Obviously, as much as I like this model light for its near-360º visibility, it is designed with such a long moment arm that it cannot withstand the torques caused by my riding through Boston's uneven roads. It's time to look for a new solution. Any suggestions?

4 Comments:

At 11/02/2005 02:35:00 PM, Blogger steve said...

1. Use two different lights on the seatpost. Add a shim (a piece of inner tube should just about be thick enough) or possibly electrical tape, if you want to be really sure the lights won't fall out.

2. Attach lights to your body or backpack. Depending on the traffic laws in Boston, this may be sufficient - here in Nova Scotia having a light attached to you (eg, helmet or backpack) obviates the requirement to have a light on the bike.

3. Both options (1) and (2) - my choice. Plus reflective tape, in 3 varieties (so far). And a reflector. And reflective tape on my bag and clothing. I tend to glow in the dark :-)

 
At 11/08/2005 11:44:00 PM, Blogger Jill said...

Also... use a headlamp attached to your helmet as a backup light.

 
At 12/11/2005 01:07:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here's my rear light recommendation FWIW: use two, one a Cateye TLD1000, the other a white-lens Lightman Xenon strobe. I've found the combination effective and they give me more room with the strobe on. YMMV.
Cheers,
Ed

 
At 4/16/2007 04:42:00 AM, Anonymous Brock Henry said...

I always add an elastic band to my lights, as I almost always find the attachments stiff and stable, but occasionally let go of the light.

The elastic band just helps keep it attached, and I position it so it holds the clip bit closed, if you know what I mean.

I started doing this after a new rear light fell off about 20 times during one ride. Since then, no light has fallen at all.

 

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